alan walker

Alan Walker – Tired (Feat. Gavin James)

Alan Walker has captured the electronic world’s attention over his short time in it with his alluring brand of bass-driven music. His singles, “Alone,” “Faded,” and “Sing Me To Sleep” have gained substantial traction and support from multitudes of producers, thus allowing him to climb the ranks to A-list status by 2017.For his newest release, the producer has paired with vocal powerhouse Gavin James to create a touching composition “Tired.” James offers reassuring verses with his usual emotive approach, while Walker provides moving underlay with pitched-up synth bursts and a simple, yet impactful top line that flows well over the track’s bass-line.“Tired” has already amassed over four million views on YouTube, speaking to the reach and appeal of both artists involved.

Marilyn-Manson

Marilyn Manson – Killing Strangers

“Killing Strangers” is a song by American rock band Marilyn Manson from their ninth studio album, The Pale Emperor (2015). It was written and produced by the eponymous lead singer and Tyler Bates, and was first released when it appeared in Keanu Reeves’ 2014 film John Wick.

kanye west

Kanye West – Ultralight Beam

“Ultralight Beam” is a plea, a confession, an anointment. It is gospel music that’s hollowed out. There is a choir and an organ, but they sound alone, as if transmitting from an empty heaven. Other voices tangle with faith in a time when God can seem most alive through the destruction of zealots; Kanye prays for Paris. Almighty death and inexplicable persecution cast shadows over this song, lingering in its empty spaces—these forces shape the stray glimmers that manage to break through.

kevin gates

Kevin Gates: Jam [ft. Trey Songz, Ty Dolla $ign, and Jamie Foxx]

It’s February, and Valentine’s Day is fast approaching. For most couples, that means frantically trying to construct a playlist of Jamie Foxx videos on YouTube. Well, worry no more—Kevin Gates has you covered. “Jam,” a bonus track from the Baton Rouge rapper’s just-released Islah, is set in motion by Foxx’s half-smirking, half-all-too-real opening skit, lifted from a 2002 comedy special. The conceit isn’t unlike his turn on Kanye West’s “Slow Jamz”: crooning about crooning, sultry singing about the great love songs. Foxx tells you to take the phone and “hold it up to the speakers and you let Luther do your talking for you.”
Of course, this is Gates, so instead of “If Only for One Night” we get, “Spit all in between both cheeks/ Now I spread ‘em.” Where the rest of Islah is completely devoid of features, Gates and Foxx are joined here by Trey Songz and Ty Dolla $ign in a bout of Atlantic Records Matchmaker. The “4:30 a.m.” star writes about sex with the same unsettled specificity he gives to murder scenes and trap houses, to the point where we all learn a bit too much about his tongue strategies. But for the most part, it’s too smooth to matter.

chelsea wolfe

Chelsea Wolfe – I Love You All the Time (Eagles of Death Metal Cover)

After Eagles of Death Metal’s November 13 show at Le Bataclan in Paris became the site of a horrific terrorist attack, it’s been impossible to think of the band without conjuring thoughts of that previously unthinkable violence. Since then, the group’s done interviews about that night and been included in countless news stories. They were nominated for a Brit award. They’re likely haunted by ghosts.
They’ve also been asking musicians to cover “I Love You All the Time,” a song from their last album Zipper Down, with proceeds going to the Sweet Stuff Foundation’s “Play It Forward” campaign, which aids victims of the attacks. It was likely chosen because the song includes a few lines of French (“Ce soir c’est le soir et toi avec moi/ Et tu viens me voir, tu viens ouh la la,”etc.), but also because its themes are universal, and easily adaptable (such as the song’s title). So far the people who’ve tackled it include Florence and the Machine, Savages, My Morning Jacks, Kings of Leon, Jimmy Eat World, Pearl Jam’s Matt Cameron, and Nada Surf.
Nobody has so thoroughly transformed “I Love You All the Time” as successfully as Chelsea Wolfe. Her deep, eerie half-speed version loses the original’s party-time feel; instead, we’re offered a gorgeous, melancholic late-night incantation. (In a way, it’s reminiscent of “The Waves Have Come,” Wolfe’s Pain Is Beauty ballad inspired by the 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that devastated Japan, which she wrote from the perspective of someone surviving a disaster.) In Wolfe’s “I Love You All the Time,” the lines “I’m never alone, I look at my phone/ If I call you up, you’re never at home” become especially heartbreaking. The repeated “I would beg if I thought it would make you stay” take on an entirely new meaning, a last grasp at life in the face of an inevitable, unexpected death. In remaking of the track, she found a way to own it.