black-eyed-peas

The Black Eyed Peas – Let’s Get It Started

“Let’s Get It Started” is a song by American group The Black Eyed Peas, released as a single on June 22, 2004. The track was the fourth single released from the band’s 2003 album Elephunk and originally appeared on the album under the title “Let’s Get Retarded”. This version was included as a bonus track on the 2004 re-issue of the album.

black-eyed-peas

The Black Eyed Peas – Don’t Phunk With My Heart

“Don’t Phunk with My Heart” (censored as “Don’t Mess with My Heart”) is a song recorded by American recording group The Black Eyed Peas, taken from the fourth studio album Monkey Business (2005). It was written by band members will.i.am, Fergie, George Pajon, Jr. and z Board; will.i.am also produced and engineered the song. The song features compositional samples of songs derived from two Hindi films of the 1970s, Apradh (1972) and Don (1978), as well as interpolations of Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam’s 1985 single “I Wonder If I Take You Home” and Gucci Crew II’s 1988 single “Sally (That Girl)”. The song was released as the first single from Monkey Business; it was first serviced to mainstream radios on April 12, 2005 in the United States.

black-eyed-peas

The Black Eyed Peas – I Gotta Feeling

“I Gotta Feeling” is the second single from The Black Eyed Peas’ fifth album The E.N.D., produced by the French DJ David Guetta. The song was released on June 23, 2009 and debuted at number two on the Canadian and Billboard Hot 100 on the week of June 27, 2009, behind the group’s “Boom Boom Pow”, making the group one of 11 artists who have occupied the top two positions of the Billboard Hot 100 at the same time. The song later reached number one on the US charts and 20 charts worldwide.

black-eyed-peas

The Black Eyed Peas – Pump It

“Pump It” is a 2006 song by The Black Eyed Peas. It was released as the fourth single from The Black Eyed Peas’ 2005 album Monkey Business. This song was also remixed for the uxe edition of the group’s fifth studio album The E.N.D. as “Pump It Harder”. “Pump It” heavily incorporates music from Dick Dale’s 1962 surf version of the song “Misirlou” (known by many for being featured in the 1994 Quentin Tarantino film Pulp Fiction). “Misirlou” is a popular folk song of Eastern Mediterranean origin, with an Egyptian version dating back to 1919, and a Greek version of 1927 which is believed to have been written by Tetos Dimitriadis, the arrangement of which is credited to Nicholas Roubanis for his 1941 released jazz version.

black-eyed-peas

The Black Eyed Peas – The Time

“The Time (Dirty Bit)” is a song by American hip hop group The Black Eyed Peas from their sixth studio album, The Beginning. The song was released as the album’s lead single on November 5, 2010. The chorus of the song samples “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” from the 1987 film Dirty Dancing.

kanye west

Kanye West – Real Friends

Celebrity is a funhouse mirror. It amplifies certain characteristics of those who live within its frame. Kanye West became world-famous several times over during the last decade, and certain parts of his public persona seemed to swell in response.
There was the ego, always there, but now ostensibly justified by success. There was the sensitivity, easily turned to bitterness and aggravated by those who didn’t like seeing a black man defend a black woman at the expense of a white woman. And there was his grief, for Donda West and perhaps for other relationships. These elements metastasized into a potent artistic combination that yielded three very different albums.
In retrospect, the first of those albums, 808s and Heartbreaks, marked a farewell tour. No , it seemed, were listeners to be granted access to Kanye’s family business, at least not the business of those who weren’t fated to live (or actively living) beneath all of the lights. And his sound, once so warm, grew colder, culminating in the icy sweat of Yeezus.
But in 2016, the gates have cracked open. The release of “Real Friends” (and a snippet of “No More Parties in LA”) today has fans screaming that the old ‘Ye is back. In its subject matter, its sound, and most crucially its vulnerability, “Real Friends” does share many features with the music Kanye made before 808s. Pivoting off MF Doom’s “Deep Fried Frenz,” West airs his guilt over—what else?—his extended family and old friends, as well as his deep anger with certain relatives, an elaboration of the lament on the 808s track, “Welcome to Heartbreak.” One story he shares, about having to buy back a computer stolen by a cousin, is a miniature study in anguish, as emotionally exhausting as “Only One” and far less effortful.
But if this track eves the artist that fans think of as old Kanye—an impression enhanced by its cover art—then it’s also one that makes enormous use of what he’s learned since Graduation. After six listens, the most memorable s are those sung with Auto-Tune. (After a dozen, everything is of a piece.) And West’s attitude has little in common with the buoyant outlo of his youth. “Real Friends” is heavy, grizzled, and sad. The track may be warm, with Kanye’s own production enhanced by the beautiful looping influences of Madlib (who produced the snippet at the end) and Dilla, but it’s the opposite of joyous.
As it stands, the song is tagged on Soundcloud with its title, #realfriends. But when it first was posted, the “friends” was missing. The only word left to describe the song was the one that, fair or not, will feel the most fitting for those who are rejoicing to have this version of Kanye West back: Real.

doughboy freddy k

Doughboy Freddy K – Bag Drop

Directed by CT FilmsThis is too smooth. Yes, the BYLUG repper, Doughboy Freddy, has ivered yet another solid offering — this one he’s calling “Bag Drop.” Frequent readers of the site know my devout for the #DBCORN posse, and this is exactly how I like my DBC. Grade A shit-talking over the classic soul samples. They can’t lose with that formula, and they hit pay dirt yet again.Keep an eye on Freddy, he’s been on a roll lately. Check the bag below.