Ghost In The Shell

Ghost In The Shell feels like a watered down, sterilised version of the original that has unsuccessfully attempted to become accessible by adding in certain plot points. Though I will be the first to admit that I had to Wikipedia the 1995 original after watching to cement the narrative in my head, I appreciated the way that the film didn’t hold my hand, and this version feels very much like it does that from beginning to end. Ultimately it just isn’t a particularly good film, so don’t let the flashy, at times interesting visuals fool you in to thinking that you are watching something better than you actually are.

daft punk

Daft Punk – One More Time

“One More Time” is a song by French electronic music duo Daft Punk, first released as a single on 13 November 2000 and later included in the 2001 album Discovery. It is a French house song featuring a vocal performance by Romanthony that is heavily Auto-Tuned and compressed. The music video of the song forms part of the 2003 animated film, Interstella 5555: The 5tory of the 5ecret 5tar 5ystem.


Raiders: The Story Of The Greatest Fan Film Ever Made

It’s been a tough few years for film fandom. While it should be a golden age — with various nerd properties hitting theaters and enjoying critical and commercial success — for a particular subset of the culture, that success has spoiled into something darker. Other outlets have written about this (in particular, Birth.Movies.Death. and The A.V. Club) covering how a (very vocal) portion of fandom has turned into an entitled and threatening bunch, affi their identities to various studio properties and attacking those who don’t share their views. It’s easy, with this loud minority issuing threats and insults to dissenters, to forget that fandom can be a source of positivity. After all, many creators start out as fans themselves.


Marilyn Manson – Killing Strangers

“Killing Strangers” is a song by American rock band Marilyn Manson from their ninth studio album, The Pale Emperor (2015). It was written and produced by the eponymous lead singer and Tyler Bates, and was first released when it appeared in Keanu Reeves’ 2014 film John Wick.


The Lobster

The overwhelming taboo surrounding romantic independence drives The Lobster, the latest low-key, high concept black comedy from Yorgos Lanthimos. In this us-but-slightly-different universe, if you haven’t found your “suitable partner” by a certain age, you’re turned into an animal. The pursuit of isn’t just aspirational; it’s mandated. It’s also laff-out-loud funny as translated in film’s absolute apathy, which might be oppressively bleak were it not so consistent with its low emotional intelligence. Collin Farrell’s puppy-eyed David has 45 days at a soon-to-be couples’ resort to find his match before he is turned into the titular lobster. The conceit is a winning one, but it’s mostly a dim flashbulb illuminating The Lobster’s wry commentary on the lengths we are willing to go to find that special someone (please slide into these DMs). In an uncluttered lo at the conventionally fraught language of , The Lobster dehumanizes the very myth that separates man from crustacean.



Aferim! doesn’t waste time moralizing about the obvious and odious evil of racism and slavery that permeates its every scene, and the matter of fact way in which it presents scenes of say, an old, jolly priest bluntly saying that it’s perfectly natural for Gypsies to be beaten and kept within the bonds of slavery does to turn one’s stomach than an overwrought caricature of an evil old racist ever could. The filmmakers respect their audience’s intelligence enough to assume they’ll understand how messed up the situations they’re presenting to them are without having to hit them over the head. Of course, the danger in doing so is to come off almost apathetic about the banality of evil, but if you’re paying attention, the somewhat pessimistic approach of Jude and his crew works marvelously.