daft punk

Daft Punk – One More Time

“One More Time” is a song by French electronic music duo Daft Punk, first released as a single on 13 November 2000 and later included in the 2001 album Discovery. It is a French house song featuring a vocal performance by Romanthony that is heavily Auto-Tuned and compressed. The music video of the song forms part of the 2003 animated film, Interstella 5555: The 5tory of the 5ecret 5tar 5ystem.

fabrikate

Fabrikate – Bodies

Just released through Kookoo Records is the awesome new album from Fabrikate, the incredibly talented duo who are making real waves with the expressive, bassy electronic sounds. The LP is “Bodies”, a ten track selection that glides with ease through an array of themes and styles,  with the pair saying, ““We didn’t really want to stick to a specific genre of music, what you hear is just what came naturally for us.

duke dumont

Duke Dumont – Ocean Drive

Ocean Drive is a good House song from Duke Dumont (on his real name: Adam George Dyment), who is an English DJ and deep house producer. He is best known for the singles “Need U (100%)”, “I Got U” and “Won’t Look Back” which both reached number 1 and 2 in the UK Singles Chart respectively. This song and video is about the Ocean Drive attractions, from South Beach neighborhood of Miami Beach.

otto knows

Otto Knows – Dying For You

Beyonce creating work that speaks to an audience like “Formation ” that might not receive the sort of mainstream, visually and sonically-enticing wisdom that Bey has perfected. This reality has never been more evident than on “Formation,” her latest off-kilter, even downright weird trap track that dropped on Saturday afternoon.

mark

Shahmen – Mark

Shahmen – Mark is a beautiful electronic music with some bass boost for you. Shahmen is a duo made of producer SENSE, from Amsterdam, and rapper B L S aka Bless, from Los Angeles. The Shahmen sound is a dance between moments of pure tonal bliss and dark, hard, banging beats with original narratives.

the range

The Range – Florida

The electronic musician James Hinton, who peforms music as the Range, has worn the same hat and buttoned-up shirt combo each time I’ve seen him perform. There’s something comfortably consistent about it, and that can be said of his music, too. For instance, his new album, Potential, feels very much like a refined continuation of 2013’s Nonfiction. In some ways, it comes off like its second part, more than an entirely new entity.
This is praise. Nonfiction found a way to make moving, emotionally resonant electronic music from seemingly not much more than YouTube samples and a great sense of dynamics and melody. Like Nonfiction, Potential features YouTube clips of anonymous people who bolster and humanize Hinton’s compositions. Hinton explains: “I found each person by using a small set of search terms on YouTube… I endeavored to tie the songs of Potential together by telling my own story alongside the stories of the people I sampled.”
The words are sometimes moving, sometimes textural, and they can often bloom as amazing hooks—even if they didn’t sound polished in their original form. On “Florida,” for example, a shaky a cappella cover of Ariana Grande’s “You’ll Never Know” becomes a star turn in Hinton’s hands. He threads the woman’s voice through a mix of spritely electronics that bring to mind Nobukazu Takemura, twinkling steel drums, and an infectious dynamic upswing to create a dance-floor anthem. Listening to her in this new context, you begin to see what she heard inside her head when she decided to upload her clip to the internet. And it’s beautiful.