SloanPeterson

Sloan Peterson – 105

Introducing Sloan Peterson (aka 24 year-old Joannah Jackson).Based in Sydney, Sloan Peterson has grown up recording songs, filming music videos and playing vintage records with her sister and friends. Her music is a nod to the garage rock music of the 50’s.The video for her single, ‘105’ is the first to be shot in the historic building of The Strand Arcade since scenes from David Bowie‘s music video for ‘Let’s Dance’ and features Sloan Peterson as well as a cast of alumni dancers from the Australian Ballet School and Sydney Dance Company.This is her debut single taken from her upcoming debut self-titled EP, out on 14 July via Mirror Records.

frost

Fröst – Keratin

Electronic band, Fröst, share new single, ‘Keratin’.Fröst is a collaboration between Franco-Swedish sound artist Johanna Bramli (vocalist for Stereolab offshoot Imitation Electric Piano) and Fujiya & Miyagi’s synth player and producer, Steve Lewis.It’s the duo’s intention to take us on a journey whilst we listen to the ethereal track of colourful proportions rooted amongst minimalistic electronic beats.Enjoy!It’s the lead track from a forthcoming new 4 track EP due for release in May under the emerging record label Lost Room.

frankie cosmos

Frankie Cosmos – On the Lips

When you see David Blaine stick an ice pick through his own hand without leaving a mark, the sight can unlock a door in your brain: Is this real? It looks real. If this is real, what is reality? It’s a freeing feeling, as if the world has been made anew right in front of your eyes; by witnessing something senseless, other things begin to make sense. Admittedly, talking about this newfound awareness can make you sound like a rube or an acid casualty, but its power should not be totally denied. Frankie Cosmos’ Greta Kline knows what it’s like to have your mind rearranged by a magic trick. She wrote a song about it.

savages

Savages – Adore

This time of year glimmers with the promise of fresh starts and unlocking one’s full potential—ostensibly positive resolutions rooted in a culture that thrives on (women’s) self-loathing. … Read the rest

porches

Porches – Be Apart

As Porches, New York’s Aaron Maine typically writes from the perspective of a sordid loner. Right on cue, the hook from “Be Apart,” off his upcoming LP Pool, goes, “I want to be apart of it all.” It’s very much in character, and it subdues any speculation that his Domino debut might be a starmaking endeavor. Thematically, “Be Apart” seems to contradict its form—a synth pop song mixed by Chris Coady (Tobias Jesso Jr., Beach House, Future Islands) in L.A.—but it’s still 2-D, nearly monophonic. This is a mockup of dance music made on Mario Paint for people whose dance moves have as much rhythm and range of motion as those of Toad.
Context matters, though, and “Be Apart” is an unusually upbeat, innocent song for Porches. When he sings the hook, it comes across as: “I want to be a part of it all,” echoing the city’s definitive paean to personal reinvention. (Not surprisingly, it was inspired by Maine’s move to the big city after growing up nearby in Westchester.) But Maine’s handsome, hungover tenor and the deflated synth tones express that success is not a foregone conclusion. “Be Apart” appears less about the ecstasy of the dance floor than a more particular kind of excitement—one that comes with embracing the fear of the first step towards it.

woods

Woods – Sun City Creeps

Nine albums in, ;Woods ;have changed course a few times, albeit marginally. Just compare “Sun City Creeps,” the opening track of the upcoming ;City Sun Eater in the River of Light, ;to the opener from their ;last album: ;”Shepherd,” with its Sweetheart of the Rodeo ;pedal steel, was warm and beautiful. ;”Sun City Creeps” ;veers away from country sheen, instead riding a sort of world music noir. A horn section opens things on a gentle, mournful note, and their staccato guitar and languid horns ;nod to old Ethiopian jazz records, mariachi bands, and Ennio Morricone soundtracks. For most other bands, these sort of aesthetic shifts from record to record rarely work, and worse, tend to look like desperate attempts at staying vital.
Most other bands aren’t Woods, though. And given their pace—nearly a record a year for 11 years—it can be easy to forget that they’re phenomenal musicians. But when the song calls for it, they’re expertly flashy, coming through with a frantic electric blues solo at the song’s midpoint. They’re arguably even better when hammering out the details—how they suddenly double up a melody, the way Jeremy Earl’s trembling voice adds tension, how they shift from minimalism to their all-hands-on-deck funk jam, and so on. It’s thoroughly captivating. Considering how many genres you could peg in “Sun City Creeps”—and despite how they’ve never made a song quite like it before—it’s impressive that this sounds definitively like Woods. Perhaps Earl’s vocals provide a through line, but it’s heartening to see this band consistently head in new directions without ever losing their voice.