Aferim

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Aferim! doesn’t waste time moralizing about the obvious and odious evil of racism and slavery that permeates its every scene, and the matter of fact way in which it presents scenes of say, an old, jolly priest bluntly saying that it’s perfectly natural for Gypsies to be beaten and kept within the bonds of slavery does more to turn one’s stomach than an overwrought caricature of an evil old racist ever could. The filmmakers respect their audience’s intelligence enough to assume they’ll understand how messed up the situations they’re presenting to them are without having to hit them over the head. Of course, the danger in doing so is to come off almost apathetic about the banality of evil, but if you’re paying attention, the somewhat pessimistic approach of Jude and his crew works marvelously.

The becomes almost imperceptibly stunning once Constandin and catch up with the runaway slave. Carfin (Cuzin Toma) was essentially raped by his master’s wife, and flees since his punishment for dishonoring his lord in such a way will most assuredly be death. While everyone involved in bringing him back demonstrates a tacit understanding that it’s consummately terrible to put a man to death for something he was coerced into doing, not a single one of them displays the faintest notion that the order they find themselves in could change, and that such a change would even be desirable. The entire journey back to Carfin’s master’s house is tense, sad, and bitterly funny, leading to a culmination that’s as angering as it is absurd.

Constandin (Teodor Corban) and his teenaged son Ionita (Mihai Comanoiu) set out to find a runaway Romani slave, their journey turning into something like a mix of John Ford’s The Searchers and Alexei German’s Hard to Be a God. Long, exquisitely composed shots in black and white of the lawman and his son traveling across a mostly harsh and unforgiving landscape are broken up by whatever the opposite of the milk of human kindness is. The commonalities that bind Jude’s disparate characters together is a shared hatred for their Turkish overlords and an almost unthinking disdain for the Romani. Compounding their quest is Constandin’s desire to make sure his son loses his virginity while in transit, to one of the most depressing prostitutes ever filmed.

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Post Author: Lisandru

Hello, my name is Alex aka Lisandru. I am an engineer, husband, blogger in free time and I'm living in Romania. This is my blog, where I post about beautiful places, automotive, games and movies reviews, videos and also about some things from my life. Never miss out on new stuff.

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