Summer Tyres Vs. Winter Tyres – 6 reasons to switch

The winter, tyre debate is one that many people have year after year and cost is one of the main they give for not making the switch. The truth is though, it doesn’t have to be expensive, car leasing and other forms of vehicle finance now offer maintenance packages too. These packages will include servicing, breakdown and tyre replacement and will be bundled up into a cheap monthly payment and added to your finance repayment – it’s simple and you’d be bonkers not too.

So, is there any point replacing perfectly good summer with winter ones? Well, we’re about to give you six good reasons why you should most definitely opt for a winter tyre during the colder months.

1. Performance

A common misconception regarding is that they’re only useful when it snows. As we said, this is a misconception and therefore not the case at all. are actually most effective at temperatures below 7⁰C, so even without snow there’ll be a noticeable difference in braking and stability when compared to summer tyres.

2. Stopping distances

Perhaps one of the biggest benefits of winter tyres is improved braking distances. In temperatures under 7⁰C, braking distances on wet roads are improved by 10% and on icy roads, your car will stop 11 metres shorter when fitted with winter tyres. In snow and ice, braking distances can be reduced to half that of a vehicle still using summer tyres. See the image below with the distances benchmark.

WinterTyre-Brake2
WinterTyre-Brake2

3. Control

Winter tyres are more effective at gripping the road’s surface because they contain more natural rubber which doesn’t harden in cold conditions.

Winter tyres also feature siping (the small zigzigs on the surface of the tyre) and this essentially acts as a ‘claw’ in the snow to improve traction.

4. requirement

If you travel a lot then it’s certainly worth noting that during certain months of the year it’s a legal requirement to have winter tyres fitted to your vehicle in some countries like and .

5. Rear wheel drive performance

Anyone that owns a rear-wheel-drive will understand the dread of looking out on a snowy morning knowing they need to head out in their car. RWD cars suffer severely in the snow, and that’s putting it mildly. The reason why rear-wheel-drives have it so bad is that they don’t benefit from the same added weight to the drive wheels as a . Added weight in this area essentially means added grip and a has that benefit thanks to the weight of the .

Post Author: Lisandru

Hello, my name is Alex aka Lisandru. I am an engineer, husband, blogger in free time and I'm living in Romania. This is my blog, where I post about beautiful places, automotive, games and movies reviews, videos and also about some things from my life. Never miss out on new stuff.

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